Achimota School PTA backs school in Rastafarians admission saga

The Parents Teacher Association (PTA) of Achimota School says it fully supports the decision of the school’s management not to admit students with dreadlocks if they fail to cut them.

The PTA in a statement signed by the Chairman, Dr. Andre Kwasi-Kumah, said the school’s rules that insist that all students must keep their hair low, simple and natural cannot be compromised or exceptions made.

They said making exceptions to the rule could create a situation where many other students would make requests to keep their preferred hairstyles.

Such a development, they insist, will breed indiscipline.

“This age-old rule has prevented unnecessary attention and time-wasting with ‘non-school’ hairdos. Any exceptions to this rule on religious grounds would open the floodgates for all types of hairstyles and breed indiscipline,” the Association said in a statement.

Authorities of the Achimota School had on Thursday turned home the dreadlocked students, asking their parents to cut off their hair or find another school for them.

The news has since caught national attention.

After public outrage, GES directed the school to admit the two first-year students in spite of their dreadlocks but subsequently made a U-turn.

The father of one of the affected boys, Raswad Nkrabea has said he will seek legal redress.

The Achimota School PTA said it supports the school’s decision and “welcome into our fold, parents who are ready to abide by the rules and regulations of Achimota school”.

Read the full statement below:

ACHIMOTA SCHOOL PTA STATEMENT ON ADMISSION OF THREE RASTAFARIAN STUDENTS

The Achimota school PTA executive unreservedly and unequivocally supports the school’s decision to enforce Its rules with respect to the admission of three students with dreadlocks hairstyle.

According to the school’s revised rules and regulations (August 2020), section H (General Appearance), item 3 states “Students must keep their hair low, simple and natural. (Students’ hair should not go through any chemical process). The scalp must not show.”

This age-old rule has prevented unnecessary attention and time wasting with ‘non-school’ hairdos. Any exceptions to this rule on religious grounds would open the floodgates for all types of hairstyles and breed indiscipline.

Furthermore, we believe Article 14(1)(e) of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana which states: ‘Every person shall be entitled to his personal liberty and no person shall be deprived of his personal liberty except in the following cases and in accordance with procedure permitted by law-

(e) for the purpose of the education or welfare of a person who has not attained the age of eighteen years” gives the school right to set rules in furtherance of education.

We, therefore, stand with the headmistress and welcome into our fold, parents who are ready to abide by the rules and regulations of Achimota school.

Citinewsroom.com